Bachelorarbeiten bei Prof. Harlander in 2019

 

Feynman diagrams as a parlor game

Abstract:
Feynman diagrams provide a very algorithmic way to generate and represent processes in particle physics. In this project, you will devise a generalization of the parlor game Scrabble to Feynman diagrams. The goal is to convey the systematics of Feynman diagrams to high school students or the general public.

The student will learn:

  • the algorithmic structure of Feynman diagrams

Requirements:

  • interest in Feynman diagrams
  • fun in teaching and outreach

Reduction of Feynman integrals with many scales

Abstract:
The algebraic reduction of a general Feynman integral to a small set of basis integrals is one of the most important aspects when calculating scattering processes for the LHC. Ever more efficient tools have emerged over the last few years. In this project, you are trying to compare various of the involved algorithms to one another, identifying their strengths and weaknesses in various situations. The focus will be on physical problems with many mass scales.

The student will learn:

  • the general structure of Feynman integrals
  • modern approaches to calculate Feynman integrals
  • efficient programming

Requirements:

  • interest in mathematical algorithms
  • good programming skills

Gradient-Flow for Scalar Fields

Abstract:
The gradient flow formalism has been suggested in 2010 to facilitate practical calculations in Lattice QCD. It has proven to be accessible also in perturbation theory and provides a promising link between the two approaches to strong interactions. In this project, you are going to devise a general approach for the application of the gradient flow formalism to scalar fields.

The student will learn:

  • the general method of the gradient flow
  • to derive and implement Feynman rules in the gradient flow formalism

Requirements:

  • familiarity with relativistic field theory
  • basic programming skills

Equations of State: History and Interpretation

Abstract:
Ever since the proposal of the ideal gas law in 1834 physicists have sought to improve upon the equation of state f(p, V, T) = 0. Due to the complexity at the molecular level, however, unsurprisingly there is no universal equation but rather a multitude of alternatives designed for specific applications, for instance phase-equilibrium calculations. The aim of this project is to write a history of the equation of state that accounts for changes in these applications, the techniques used to construct it, and its underlying physical basis. The expectation is that this will shed light on how physical meaning is assigned to arbitrary parameters and how such parameters, in conjunction with other physico-mathematical techniques, enable physical insight. Aptitudes: A willingness to look at familiar material in a new way and some capacity for essay-writing.Areas of focus: Historical research, physical interpretation of arbitrary parameters, theories of fluid statics.